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What’s that you say? You can’t get enough of Flappy Bird and it’s horrendous clones? You’re miserable because it’s been taken off every legitimate mobile market on the planet? Oh, and you also happen to own a copy of Grand Theft Auto IV for PC? Well what a coincidence, because what I’m going to tell you next will most probably tickle you in ways sprites ripped from a certain Nintendo game never could.

By this weekend, a Flappy Bird mod for Grand Theft Auto IV will be made publicly available for everyone to enjoy. Or, in my case, make me want to kill myself because the internet has just gone too far.

Scripting Gods ‘julionib‘ and ‘quechus13‘ have been messing around with the PC version of Grand Theft Auto IV for quite some time. They’ve released some mods mods for the game before, like GTA V style character switching and Iron Man IV, but now they’ve hopped on the Flappy Bird bandwagon and put their modding skills to good use. The mod will let all three protagonists (Johnny, Niko and Luis) don a Flappy Bird helmet and fly around Liberty City by strategically pressing the jump button at key points to keep them afloat, similar to the original Flappy Bird mechanics. However, this time, instead of dodging green pipes, you’ll be trying to fly into pedestrians as they flee in terror upon sighting you, all the while dodging buildings, traffic lights, cars, aeroplanes, and God knows what else you’ve modded into your game. Successfully smacking a pedestrian from the air will net you points, but colliding into anything else will make you lose all those points and force you to try again.

Who needs Grand Theft Auto V on PC when you’ve got this, eh? >.>

The mod will be available on the creators’ web blog this weekend, which also happens to be full of rich information regarding modding Rockstar’s open world prostitute killing and drunk driving simulator.  Check it out in action below, and weep tears of blood.

Written by Cohen Singh

Cohen Singh

There are no choices. Nothing but a straight line. The illusion comes afterwards, when you ask “why me?” and “what if?”. When you look back and see the branches, like a pruned bonsai tree, or forked lightning. If you had done something differently, it wouldn’t be you, it would be someone else looking back, asking a different set of questions.